NEW EDITION FEBRUARY 2024

 

Walks Isle of Arran 

Walks Isle of Arran

Author: Richard Hallewell

Rewalked by: Richard Hallewell & Becky Coope

It is always a pleasure to go walking on Arran: one of the finest walking areas in Scotland, with a good array of walks and all within easy distance of one another. The best-known route on the island is the splendid climb up Goatfell (2867ft/874m), which has some of the finest views of any peak in Scotland, but there are also plenty of coastal, riverside, woodland and even parkland (Brodick Castle) walks on the island.

There have been a lot of changes to the routes since the guide was last rewalked, so it is well-worth getting the new edition if you haven’t been to the island for a while. The biggest addition is an overview of the Arran Coastal Way: a 65 mile/105km waymarked route, on paths, tracks and public roads, which runs right around the island. It is impossible to describe the route in detail, but the best sections are described in other routes in the guide. Elsewhere, there has been a mass of changes to parking (Machrie Stone Circles), route details (the start of the path up Glen Iorsa, the route from Brodick to Dhunan) and signage (the path from Brodick to Brodick Castle, and the paths up Glen Rosa and Goatfell from Brodick Castle). A couple of short routes have become overgrown and have been removed; the descriptions of the walks at Glenashdale Falls and Eas Mòr have been altered.

What hasn’t changed is the quality and variety of the scenery and the walking: past the ruined castle at Lochranza, along the coast from Blackwaterfoot to the King’s Cave, the fern-filled dens at Eas Mòr or the rough path around the Cock of Arran. People will cross to the island for the day to climb Goatfell, but it is well worth going for longer. You won’t exhaust the walking in a week.

For more details or to buy a copy, click here.

Photograph: Coast near King’s Cave

 

NEW EDITION SEPTEMBER 2023

 

Walks Isle of Skye including Raasay

Author: Paul Williams

Rewalked by: Richard Hallewell & Becky Coope

Skye must be one of the best-known walking areas in Britain. Serious climbers come for the Cuillins, but there are terrific walks throughout the island, attracting many visitors every year. This popularity does put pressure on the walks, of course, and we approached this year’s rewalking assuming changes to our descriptions would be needed. This proved to be the case.

Some had nothing to do with the walks themselves. At three of the most popular walks – The Quiraing, The Old Man of Storr and the Fairy Pools – the parking has been extended and improved since we were last on the island – a big help, as visitors were previously simply lining up by the road, which was causing considerable problems. At Fairy Pools, there is also a new footbridge, replacing the stepping stones – very handy when the burns are in spate.

Elsewhere, we needed to alter the access points to the trails behind Armadale Castle, and there has been a big improvement to the path out to the Coral Beaches, beyond Dunvegan. We have put in the new start to the climb up Ben Tianavaig, just south of Portree, shortened the route past Macleod’s Maidens, removed our climb up Beinn Edra (the increased popularity of the Fairy Glen means that parking is all but impossible, and the path over the moor beyond the road end has disappeared) and added the little Marine Mammal Trail as an extra walk from Kylerhea. A number of smaller changes were needed elsewhere, which is all to say that, if you’re visiting the island, be sure you have the current edition!

Skye needs little recommendation: it is one of the best walking areas in the country. Just try to visit when it is dry (or you will never see the top of a hill) and leave plenty of time for getting around – road maintenance appeared not to be a priority when we visited, and this did tend to lengthen journey times.

For more details or to buy a copy, click here.

Photograph: View from The Quiraing

 

BESPOKE BRANDED GUIDES

 

Branded Guides

In addition to our existing series of walks guides, we have recently started producing unique, branded guides for specific clients.  These can be rebranded versions of our existing books, or bespoke guides with a different selection of routes – including, if necessary, new walks – with new titles and covers.  Buyers will find these guides useful as part of their customer service and/or for marketing purposes, and they are free to sell or otherwise distribute them as they wish.

We have greatly enjoyed producing these new books, which allow us to make new use of the walks we have described over the years, and to bring them to the attention of new groups of potential walkers.

If you are interested in ordering a branded guide – or simply wish to explore what might be possible – please contact us at sales@hallewell-publications.co.uk and we will be happy to explain what is involved and discuss the options.

 

 

NEW BOOK AUGUST 2023

 

Walks Peebles, Selkirk & Lanark

Author: Richard Hallewell

This book marks our first venture (in this series) into the Scottish Borders – a beautiful part of the country with many miles of excellent walking.  The area covered is made up of the old counties of Peebles and Selkirk plus the southern part of Lanarkshire.  For those who don’t know the area, this is a landscape of low to moderate hills – mostly grass-covered, but with some moorland on the higher peaks – intersected by long, fertile valleys.  The major rivers are the Tweed and the upper waters of the Clyde; the main settlements Peebles, Selkirk, Biggar and Lanark – of which the latter, with a population of around 9,000, is the largest.  This is a distinctly rural area, with a small population clustered in old county towns and small villages.  There is a small amount of commercial woodland, but the landscape is mostly open.  The farming is largely livestock, with more arable land as you move west and south-east, out of the hills.
It is a deceptively peaceful landscape, but historically, this was the land of the Border Reivers – the families of cattle rustlers and blackmailers who inhabited the territory between Scotland and England – and the numerous castles passed along these routes bear witness to this lawless past.  Beyond this, the main cultural contribution of the area has been to literature, and you will pass many references and monuments to the great Border writers: Sir Walter Scott, John Buchan and James Hogg.
The walking is terrific.  There are fine hill climbs, up Broad Law, Lee Pen, the Broughton Heights and the isolated (and highly popular) Tinto Hill, south-west of Biggar.  The hills are not particularly high (at 2,760ft/840m, Broad Law is the highest peak in this area), and there is no scrambling required on the rounded peaks, but the views are splendid – though note that great care needs to be taken with navigation amongst this mass of low, rounded hills.  There are also excellent river walks, notably by the Falls of Clyde (starting from the planned industrial town of New Lanark) and along the Tweed from Peebles, passing Neidpath Castle.  Elsewhere, there is a circuit of St Mary’s Loch, a walk through the grounds at Bowhill House and a cluster of forest walks in the Tweed Valley.
There are two long-distance walks in the area.  The Southern Upland Way passes through, on its route coast-to-coast, and forms part of some of the walks in the guide – notably the paths along the ridge north of the Yarrow Water.  If you want something shorter, the John Buchan Way is a 13 mile/21km route linking Peebles and Broughton.
This is a beautiful, peaceful area, and any visitor could easily spend a week exploring its attractions without exhausting the varied walking.
For more details or to buy a copy click here.
Photograph: The Falls of Lanark

 

 

 

 

NEW EDITION MAY 2023

Walks North York Moors Western Area

Walks North York Moors Western Area

Author: Richard Hallewell

Rewalked by: Maggie & Richard Legate

Our introduction to these walks was the short climb up Roseberry Topping, a distinctive hill sometimes compared to the Matterhorn, and what a superb introduction. The views stretched out for miles…

Despite walking in the month of June, these walks were always a joy because me met very few people. Covid was beginning to fade out at the time we were walking, but it still felt good not being on busy walks and somehow I even managed to test positive at the end of the weeks walking!

Ingleby Bank was fascinating, and the Incline marks the point where the railway carrying the ironstone from Rosedale left the moors and dropped down into Cleveland at a gradient of up to 1 in 5. Wagons attached to steel ropes were pulled and lowered up and down the slope simultaneously. Not so good if the ropes gave way of course!

The Wain Stones provided another superb vantage point and was a dramatic rock outcrop of weathered sandstone, a very prominent feature in the North York Moors.

For more information, or to buy a copy, please click here.

Photograph: The Wain Stones (Walk 8)

 

 

 

NEW EDITION MAY 2023

Walks North York Moors Eastern Area

Walks North York Moors Eastern Area

Author: Richard Hallewell

Rewalked by: Maggie & Richard Legate

Fabulous extensive moorland coupled with costal walking with delightful views, this book has an incredible variety of landscapes and as you walk on the moors, they appear to go on for ever and ever.. and ever!

Picturesque villages abound and walks ending by villages always seem to provide welcome food and drink in the form of cafes and pubs. After the glorious weather we encountered liquid refreshment or ice cream was always welcome if not an absolute necessity.

We stayed at the small village of Rosedale Abbey, which meant all routes bar one meant a very steep climb onto the moors, or a very steep descent to our village at the end of the day, nerve racking at times!

Other highlights included The Bridestones, other worldly natural rock formations and The Hole of Horcum, a huge natural amphitheatre. Not forgetting the North York Moors Railway of course. We used the steam train to get from Pickering to Goathland to do the walk at Goathland, travelling at a very leisurely pace.

For more information, or to buy a copy, please click here.

Photograph: Cliffs at Robin Hood’s Bay (Walk 12)

 

NEW EDITION DECEMBER 2022

 

Walks Grassington & Wharfedale

Walks Grassington

Authors: Richard Hallewell

Rewalked by: Steve & Carole Bignell

We really enjoyed exploring this fascinating part of Yorkshire, which we had never visited before.  We travelled with our dog, so had to walk some of the routes separately, as not all are dog friendly. 

Our base for the week was an apartment right in the centre of Grassington, which was within easy driving distance of all of the walks and perfectly located for picking up a morning croissant from the bakery. The small town has  several pubs and plenty of places to eat  All of the pubs were dog friendly and served excellent beer.  As the weather was glorious, we spent several evenings sat outside at the pub recounting the day’s walking.  

The area is rich in history, being the Yorkshire residence of the Duke of Devonshire. All of the walks were beautiful, but we particularly enjoyed our walk along the riverside and on to Bolton Abbey. The stepping stones across the river were enjoyed by children and grandparents alike. 

We must, of course, mention the walks taking in Simon’s Seat which offered stunning views of the heather moorlands and Wharfedale.  Sadly, dogs are not welcome on the grouse moors at any time of year.

If you are a lover of wildlife, then the walks through Grasswood and up to the Strid may be your favourite.  We saw an interesting variety of wildlife and even had the opportunity to watch a kingfisher flying along the river. However, be aware that some fields that you need to cross have cows in. 

We thoroughly enjoyed our week in Wharfedale and are definitely planning to return to enjoy many of these walks again in the future.

For more information or to buy a copy click here.

 

NEW EDITION MAY 2022

 

Walks Wester Ross: Southern Area

Walks Wester Ross Southern Area

Authors: Richard Hallewell & Becky Coope

Rewalked by: Mike Lumb, Ronnie Mealyou, Rob & Becky Coope & Richard Hallewell

Wester Ross is a big area, and travelling between walks can take a good part of the day, so a team descended on the area covered by Walks Wester Ross Southern Area to check the routes for the new edition.  Covid restrictions also played their part in this rewalk, so the work was spread out over a few months.
For those who haven’t visited the area before, it is characterised in the north, around Torridon, by huge mountains rearing up from inland and coastal sea lochs.  The south of the area, around Kyle of Lochalsh and stretching down to Loch Hourn in the far south, is gentler in nature.  In addition, the remote Applecross peninsula, accessed by two dramatic roads (including the famous Bealach na Ba from Kishorn), provides excellent walking.
All the settlements in the area are small, but the largest – Kyle of Lochalsh and Lochcarron – are good service centres, and there are excellent shops and petrol stations in smaller villages, such as Plockton, Sheildaig and Glenelg.  There is also a number of good small cafés and restaurants throughout the area, so visitors will not struggle to get supplies locally.   The roads, even the major ones, are for the most part single-track, so plenty of time should be allowed for travelling around.
We have made little more than the usual small changes to most of the routes in the book, but two walks had more significant problems and have been removed.  The hill pass from Glasnock to Lochcarron has become difficult to follow in places, and has been replaced by a there-and-back walk to a fine hill loch, Loch Gaineamhach, in the hills above Kishorn.  Difficulties with parking have led to the route through Gleann Beag, near Glenelg, being dropped and replaced by a fine circuit; starting from from Galltair, near Glenelg, leading out to remote Ardintoul then returning along the coast.  There has also been a lot of new signposting in the National Trust woodlands around Balmacara Square, so we have improved our coverage of the available walks here and included a new circuit from Balmacara.
There really is something for everyone in this area as far as walking is concerned.  While we avoid the mountain tops in this guide (many are simply beyond the scope of this series) there are plenty of opportunities to get into the foothills in the walks featured, or to enjoy a fine woodland or coastal walk.
For more information or to buy a copy, click here
Photo: Bothy in Glenlicht (centre left); setting off from Balmacara (bottom left)

 

NEW EDITION MARCH 2022

 

Walks Inveraray & South Argyll

Walks Inveraray & South Argyll

Authors: Paul Williams & Richard Hallewell

Rewalked by: Richard & Maggie Legate

This is a gem of a book and we enjoyed exploring this fascinating part of Scotland, which we didn’t know at all prior to our visit. Our base for the week was a cottage was on the Crinan Canal at Bellanoch, and the only downside was that we unfortunately missed a superb evening of Northern Lights by having the curtains closed!

The area is rich in castles, neolithic and bronze age remains and superb cup and ring marked stones, and we could have happily spent much longer visiting the many archeological sites.

Stretching from the lighthouse at the southern tip of the Mull of Kintyre, to Inverary in the north, there’s much to see and admire. In addition, as you are never far from the sea, there are always great views.

For us, the most fascinating walk was the tidal visit to Davaar Island along a lengthy spit of land. We viewed the walk from a hill above Campbeltown later in the day, at high tide, and marvelled at the fact that we’d been able to walk to a what was a very obvious island, a feat that now seemed unthinkable!  Another highlight were the walks from Tarbert on the east coast of the peninsula.

A boat trip is always a treat, especially on a Caledonian MacBrayne ferry, and so the visit to the delightful Isle of Gigha, with it’s clear turquoise water and fine views across to The Paps of Jura to the west, and Northern Ireland to the south west, was particularly memorable.

Forestry and Land Scotland have been busy in this area, and we were pleased to find new and informative signage and interpretation boards on many of the walks. FLS have also been carrying out a lot of harvesting in the area and this meant that the walk up Beinn Ghuilean, south of Campbeltown, which had featured in the previous edition of the book, had to be dropped from this new edition. It has been replaced by a short walk from the village of Saddell which passes an historic abbey and castle before arriving at a fine sandy beach.

This is a fine and varied area and often quite a bit quieter than other areas of Scotland’s west coast, and although there are no mountain walks, there is a fine range of walks to choose from.

For more details or to buy a copy click here.

Photos: Tarbert Castle (centre left), beach on Gigha (bottom left)

 

ONE MILLION BOOKS SOLD!

This year we reached a real milestone for the company when we passed the sale of our one millionth walking guide.

A huge thank you goes out to all of you who have bought and enjoyed the guides over the years, and to those who have come back and bought more. Over the years we have been lucky enough to hear from a good number of you, and this has led to many useful tips about routes and interesting and memorable conversations.

The series started in 1994, with Walks Deeside, and the success of that book (No 1 in the Press & Journal best-seller list) encouraged us to start work on a series covering the whole of Scotland, plus the best walking areas in England. We haven’t quite finished the series yet, but then I doubt if we would have expected to get as far as we have – or to have sold so many books – when we started out.

A lot has changed over the years. When we produced Deeside we were split between Aberdeen and Edinburgh, then for a long time we worked from our HQ by Loch Tummel, in Perthshire, until the office and warehouse finally migrated to Argyll, where they are today.

The way the books are sold has changed dramatically over the years, too. The guides were originally designed to be sold primarily through the large network of local Tourist Information Centres and bookshops, and online selling was in its infancy. The rise of online selling in part contributed to the sad loss of the vast majority of local TICs in Scotland. Small independent bookshops seemed to be going the same way, though – in part as a result of Covid – that trend seems to have reversed. Waterstones have always been a great supporter of our series, and remain one of our main sales outlets alongside the Visitor Information Centres, Amazon (inevitably!) and our own website. Once again, we are really grateful to the buyers who have consistently stocked the guides over the years, and to the regional and national wholesalers – many of whom we have been working with for well over 20 years – who keep the guides in the public eye.

Producing the guides has provided a wonderful opportunity to explore the country, and to visit corners we would never otherwise have reached. And where we haven’t been able to do the work ourselves, we have been lucky to work with a number of writers who have put their own style on the books they produced.

One of the main features of the guides is that we aim to keep them as up-to-date as possible, and to achieve that we have a small team of checkers who have undertaken regular rewalks over the years. They brave rain, snow and occasionally blistering sun to undertake the checks – usually in well-orchestrated walking weeks. A great thank you to all of the writers and checkers we have worked with over the years.

Like everything else, the writing and research has changed through the years. Richard started taking hand-written notes, then tape cassette voice recordings, and now uses digital dictaphones. This system has been faultless until one episode this year, on a rewalk of the Stirling book, when a spectacularly heavy shower when descending Dumyat soaked the recorder and resulted in the loss of the whole week’s notes. A second rewalk of the entire book resulted in a change of policy and a new recorder!

Computers were not commonplace when we started, and, being from design and publishing backgrounds, we put the early books together with hand-drawn maps and covers, and with the routes added carefully using a 3.0 Rotring pen to give the right size of dot! Contour shading and water were painstakingly cut out of Letratone with a swivel knife. All text and map lettering arrived from the printer on a roll of bromide paper and had to be cut out and pasted in place on the page and maps. The clear memory of finishing a job and finding one ‘0’ from a scale bar lying on the floor is still painful. Where DID it come from? In those days it was a bit of a leap of faith, especially with the covers, as we had no idea what the finished book would look like until they arrived from the printers.

All that has changed now, of course, and the books are put together on computer – though, as a trained artist, I have always looked to retain a high degree of artwork in the books. The maps all start life as a pen drawing which is then scanned and developed on the computer. The covers too start with a pen and ink outline (rather than the torn cartridge paper which we used in the early days). The pen and ink line illustrations, which have been a feature of the books since we started, are still carried out in exactly the same way, drawn with a Rotring pen on drafting film.

And then there are the printers. We have worked with quite a number over the years, and apart from one brief (and entirely unsuccessful) excursion abroad, we have proudly always printed the books in the UK. Predominately we have worked with Scottish printers and they have invariably done a great job. Sadly, the print trade, like many others, suffered from cheap foreign competition and many businesses went to the wayside over the years. But the technology has moved on rapidly, and UK printers are now extremely capable and competitive. For a number of years we have been working with the excellent Barr Printers in Glenrothes, and all of the books are printed on FSC papers.

We have thoroughly enjoyed the last 26 years producing the series and look forward to the keeping the series relevant as times change – and maybe even reaching the elusive goal of finishing the coverage of Scotland…

Rebecca

 

Photos:  Top right: No 1 in the Press & Journal charts in 1994; Right: The books at the recent St Duthac Festival in Tain.

 

NEW EDITION NOVEMBER 2021

 

Walks Malham & The Three Peaks

Walks Malham & The Three Peaks

Author: Richard Hallewell

Rewalked by: Richard & Maggie Legate

We were pleased to have the chance to check the routes for the Malham guide – the most westerly of the three current guides to the Yorkshire Dales. The walking is terrific, and you get the feeling that not much changes along the routes as you walk along paths, or by dry stone dykes, which scarcely alter through the years. It is all very photogenic, and there seems to be a delightful pub at the end of every walk! As the routes are all well established, very few significant adjustments were needed to the descriptions; just odd changes to gates and signage.

Central to the book are two settlements: the delightful market town of Settle and the little village of Malham. The latter is tiny, and can be incredibly busy, but once you get away from the wildly popular short walks (to the massive limestone amphitheatre of Malham Cove and the gorge of Gordale Scar) you quickly lose sight of the crowds and the countryside empties of humans in favour of interesting orchids and mountain pansies. There are fascinating geological features throughout the area, including pot holes, extensive limestone pavements and the strange Norber Erratics.

Beyond Malham, the main walking attractions are the ’Three Peaks’: Whernside, Ingleborough and Pen-y-ghent. Their distinctive silhouettes are a feature of the area, and many visitors see it as a challenge to climb all three. As an added attraction, Whernside and Pen-y-ghent can be reached using the fabulous Settle to Carlisle railway.

This is one of Britain’s classic walking areas, and one to which it will always be a pleasure to return.

For more details, or to buy the book, click here.

Photo:  Ingleborough from the Stainforth Waterfall walk.


 

 

 

NEW EDITION NOVEMBER 2021


Walks South Dartmoor

Author: Richard Hallewell

Rewalked by Rob & Becky Coope

The South Dartmoor check had been another victim of Covid restrictions. Originally planned for April 2020, it had to be re-scheduled a couple of times, but we eventually managed to get everything in place for a visit in early October. Our base for the week was the delightful Old Byre at Dousland near Yelverton. The owners had been extremely helpful and allowed us to change bookings on more than one occasion due to restrictions, and so it was with great joy that we finally arrived at the cottage on a sunny afternoon. It was a wonderful base and perfectly placed to access all of the walks in the book.

Never having visited Dartmoor before, I was immediately taken with the area. The grazing ponies are a wonderful feature of the moors. We were there during the busy ‘annual gather’ and it was great to see this unfold through the week. The walking is wonderful. The moor walks are mostly on short turf, passing masses of historical relics from many periods as well as the wonderful natural torrs which are a feature of the area. Lower level walks featured run through the wooded valleys of the rivers which carry water off the moor.

It is very different to other areas we have visited. There are often a huge number of grassy paths criss-crossing the moor – making it quite difficult to give precise directions, so a degree of navigational skill is needed, particularly if the famous mist rolls in! In general, the area was much quieter than many of the other areas we cover. The towns and villages are wonderful, with many quaint pubs and cafés, but minutes after leaving them you find yourself on the open moor. Many car parks were busy, but again, once you got a mile or so from them you could quickly find yourself in complete solitude with only the grazing sheep, cattle and horses for company.

The minor roads which lead to some of the smallest villages in the area are quite a challenge, being very narrow with few passing places, and to help alleviate the problems there seems to be a move to discourage visitors from driving to these. As a result, we had to make a couple of major changes to the book, the main one was rewriting the walk on Harford Moor as the car park at the original start point has been closed. We also decided to drop the walk from the tiny village of Scorriton for the same reason.

If you have not visited Dartmoor before, then we can thoroughly recommend it as a walking destination. Highlights of the week included the routes around Burrator Reservoir, the circuit by the wooded valley of the River Walkham and the high level circuit above the Avon Dam Reservoir.

For more details, or to buy a copy, please click here.

Photos: A sunny day at the tarn on Cox Tor (centre); dropping down from Corndon Down (bottom)

 

 


 

NEW EDITION NOVEMBER 2021


Walks Fife

Authors: Owen Silver & Richard Hallewell

Re-walked by: Julia Hallewell and Richard Hallewell

Of all of our book rewalks, none was more badly disrupted by Covid than this one. Julia started looking at the routes in 2019. (She had only recently moved to the county and, being a non-driver, was delighted to find that almost all the routes could be reached by public transport.) She provided us with her complete notes at the start of 2020, only for everything to go haywire. There were still details to be checked, but it was impossible to get out there to check them. In the meantime, travel restrictions meant that books covering populous areas (not just Fife, but also Perth, Stirling, Aberdeen and East Lothian), which traditionally sold relatively slowly, began to take off, as people looked for walking closer to home. As a result, we had to print up a short run of the existing Fife guide, and by the time that had sold out we needed to check all the routes again!

Anyway, it finally got done, and I am pleased we were able to give it full attention, because it is an area where routes change quite quickly – not the major set-piece walks of the area (the Lomond Hills and the Fife Coastal Path), which don’t change much, but the others. A couple of routes were so altered, or had become so difficult to describe, that we dropped them from the guide. Others were simplified. On the two routes on the south side of the Firth of Tay, for instance (ie, between Wormit and Balmerino, and west of Balmerino through Birkhill Woods), we have either simplified the optional inland return or removed it completely. Elsewhere there were a lot of minor changes to signage and route descriptions. The climb up Norman’s Law from Luthrie, for example, has been completely rewritten.

Another route which has been altered a lot is the climb up Benarty Hill. Previously this was just a possible extension to the path around Loch Ore, but now it is a separate route, so we can include the climb to the summit of the hill (which has terrific views over Loch Leven), an alternative return, and a mention of the path over to the RSPB centre at Vane Farm. In addition, we have now included an introductory walk around the centre of St Andrews – a beautiful town, which includes so much of interest that it deserved an entry of its own. Since the last edition of the book, the Fife Pilgrim Way, a long-distance waymarked path across the county, has been opened to complement the Coastal Path. This 64mile/103 km route is outlined in the book and readers will come across sections of it on some of the walks featured.

As I say, one of the few plus points of Covid was that it encouraged people to explore their local walks. In Fife, at least, they won’t have been disappointed. The county has its share of built-up and industrial areas, but there are some beautiful towns and villages, and once you get into the countryside there are some beautiful paths to be found. The coastal woods at Tentsmuir are a tonic on any day.

Sadly, the original author of this guide, Owen Silver, recently passed away.  We hope he would have approved of the changes we have made to the routes.

For more details or to buy a copy please click here.

Photos: Coastal Path – Anstruther to Crail (centre); the beach by Tenstmuir Forest walking from Tayport (bottom)


 

 

 

NEW EDITION AUGUST 2021

Walks Exmoor

Walks Exmoor

Author: Richard Hallewell

Re-walked by: Ronnie Mealyou & Mike Lumb

The rewalk of Walks Exmoor was another victim of the Covid travel restrictions, but we finally managed to get round to it in July this year. This is a beautiful walking area. The name ‘Exmoor’ is derived from the area of grass and heather moorland surrounding the upper waters of the River Exe, but the definition has now been extended to include lower level farmland and woodland, as well as the area’s spectacular coastal scenery. The book covers the area comprising Exmoor National Park which was created in 1954.

The towns and villages within the Park are varied and picturesque, with winding main streets, fine architecture and numerous thatched buildings. The little village of Dunster is a particular gem.

The greatest density of walks in this guide is along the coast, which contains the bulk of the area’s most dramatic scenery and a continuous footpath – the South West Coast Path. Highlights include the well-known walk west from the little harbour of Lynmouth to the dramatic crags of the Valley of Rocks (see bottom left), as well as a section of the SWCP running across the steep slopes between Heddon’s Mouth and Woody Bay.

Changes required to the book were minimal. If you haven’t visited this area before, there is a great selection of varied walking and no shortage of places to enjoy some refreshments!

For more details, or to buy a copy, click here.


 

NEW EDITION AUGUST 2021

 

Walks Stirling

Walks Stirling

Author: Alistair Lawson

Rewalked by: Richard Hallewell

The area around Stirling sometimes seems a bit of a forgotten corner for walkers in Scotland, but there are some splendid routes.  The Ochils give terrific hill walking – whether you are looking at the hill climbs (Ben Cleuch, King’s Seat) or the lineal paths through the hills to Perthshire – while the Gargunnock Hills and Campsie Fells also provide fine moorland walking.  Beyond that there is a string of den walks above the ‘Hillfoot’ towns which run along the foot of the Ochils – including Dollar Glen which, with the brooding Castle Campbell (see bottom left) at its head, is perhaps the finest in Scotland – and visits to the unexpected coastline of the upper Forth.  Plus a very large stone Pineapple (see right).
      Personal favourites are the crossing from Dollar to Auchterarder (which also appears in Walks Crieff, Comrie & Kinross, described in the opposite direction) and the three-waterfall walk in the Gargunnock Hills, with its fine views north to the hills of Perthshire and the Trossachs.
      As you might expect in such a busy and populous area, there have been quite a few changes to the routes since we last looked at them, some of which have led to new route descriptions.  The old ‘Back Road’ route linking the Hillfoots has been rebranded as the ‘Diamond Jubilee Way’ (though the retention of some older signs can be a little confusing), and a good deal of work has been done to tidy up the popular climb up Dumyat.
      If you haven’t tried walking in this area before, you will find some pleasant surprises.

For more details or to buy a copy, click here.


 

 

NEW EDITION JULY 2021

 

Walks Aviemore incl. Glenmore & Speyside

Walks Aviemore

Author: Richard Hallewell

Re-walked by: Maggie & Richard Legate

The Aviemore book covers the walks around Glenmore and Rothiemurchus Forest, the north west Cairngorms, and the Spey Valley between Newtonmore in the south and Grantown-on-Spey in the north. Though we live quite close, we were not familiar with many of the walks, and it was fantastic to get to know some beautifully maintained paths and wilderness routes.
One of the highlights for me was my first climb onto the Cairngorm plateau.  It has its dangers, of course, and great care has to be taken (it was windy and bitterly cold when we climbed Cairn Gorm, and there was plenty of snow, even in June), but it is also highly dramatic – and we were lucky enough to see both a ring ouzel and a snow bunting on the tops.  Another highlight was the long route from Glenmore round to Loch Avon, though that also needs a little planning.  We chose to camp overnight on a nearby Corbett (Creag Mhor) before descending to the Fords of Avon and seeing the loch surrounded by high, snowy peaks in the early morning sunshine.
It isn’t all long routes, of course, and there are terrific shorter walks through the Caledonian Pinewoods south of Loch Morlich and in the hills behind the towns and villages of the Spey Valley, as well as a number of routes also suitable for cyclists –such as the route from Nethy Bridge to Glenmore (see bottom left).
There were no major alterations needed to the book this time, though changes have been made to the signposting of the forest walks around Loch Morlich.

For more details, or to buy a copy, click here.


 

 

NEW EDITION JULY 2021

 

Walks Grasmere, Ambleside & Windermere - Author: Richard Hallewell

Walks Grasmere

Author: Richard Hallewell

Re-walked by Maggie & Richard Legate

We spent a week in the little village of Chapel Stile while rewalking Walks Grasmere – the book centred on the northern end of Windermere, Rydal Water (the home of William Wordsworth) and Grasmere, and spreading west to Great Langdale and east to Kentmere.  This is one of the most popular centres in the Lake District and the walking is superb.  Our personal favourites were the climbs up Fairfield and Helm Crag, from the village of Grasmere, and the loop linking Ambleside and Troutbeck.  Other highlights were the circuit from Tilberthwaite to Little Langdale (don’t miss the Andy Goldsworthy sheepfold artwork near the car park) and the low level circuit from Elterwater (see bottom left).
      Few major changes were needed to the routes – all of which have been established for many years.  The one exception was on Walk 7 (Pike of Blisco), where the bridge over the Oxendale Beck is currently missing.  The structure was washed away when the beck was in spate, and we were amazed to see how far it had been carried by the water.  In case the bridge has not been replaced, walkers should plan for a possible alternative ending to the route.
      This is a beautiful part of the country, and for that reason it can be very busy during peak periods of the year.  If you have the option, it might be best to visit in spring or autumn, when the paths are quieter.
      For more details or to buy a copy, click here.

 

NEW EDITION JULY 2021

 

Walks Keswick

Author: Richard Hallewell

Re-walked by: Maggie & Richard Legate

The Covid restrictions had a significant impact on the Keswick rewalk – much as they had on everything else!  We started in November, but had to cut our stay short and complete the check in April.  Not that it is a hardship to visit the delightful market town and its surrounding hills, and it was a pleasure to be walking the routes when they were a little quieter than usual.
These are classic walks, of course, and very well-trodden.  Highlights for us were the climb up Grey Knotts – with its terrific views of Great Gable, High Stile and the rest of the peaks – and the clamber up and over Hay Stacks from the east end of Buttermere.  Also the lower climbs from Rosthwaite to Watendlath Tarn, Latrigg with its fine views over Keswick (see bottom left) and the circuit of Crummock Water.  In fact, one of the great attractions of the area is the variety of walking available.
In addition to the usual minor alterations needed to the write-ups for the routes, erosion had caused problems on a couple of the walks.  The walking/cycling route following the old railway line by the River Greta (Walk 4: Castlerigg Stone Circle) was closed – though work was being carried out, and it should be reopened soon – as was the path by Newlands Beck (Walk 9: Keswick to Newlands Beck).  It is unclear how long this latter path will be closed, but if the signs are still up when you visit then please follow the diversion we suggest via Swinside Inn.
Whether you enjoy high level treks or short, wooded lakeside walks, Keswick is one of the classic outdoor centres in the UK and should be visited by anyone with an interest in walking.

For more information, or to buy a copy, click here.


 

 

NEW EDITION JUNE 2021


Walks Deeside

Author: Richard Hallewell

Re walked by: Ronnie, Grant & Ewan Mealyou and Mike Lumb

Deeside is one of Scotland’s classic walking areas: the peaks of the Cairngorms and Lochnagar, the hill routes over the Mounth to Angus and the pine woods of Deeside itself.  This was the first book we published in the series, and we packed it with as much content as we could manage: over 230 miles/370km of walking, including eight Munros and eight lineal hill crossings (which need to be walked there-and-back if you are struggling for transport).  As such, it is probably the toughest rewalk of them all, and it took a group of walkers to get it checked in good time this time around.

The quality of the walking is terrific: the high rounded peaks of Ben Macdui and Beinn a’ Bhuird; the long moorland treks of Jock’s Road and the Firmounth and Fungle; and the path around Loch Muick, in the shadow of Lochnagar – plus the splendid shorter walks through the pinewoods of Glen Tanar, over Creag Choinnich, around Loch Kinord and the splendid natural amphitheatre of Burn o’Vat (see bottom left), and others.  The area itself, centred around the villages of Braemar, Aboyne and Ballater, is a beautiful place to visit.
There were few major alterations this time around.  There was some adjustment made to the routes around Derry Lodge and Allanaquoich, and at the north end of the Fungle, but the only major addition was the new path at the north end of the route from Ballater to Glen Tanar (a useful addition, as it allows you to avoid walking along the narrow B976).  That apart, only the usual minor changes were made to route descriptions and signage.
Most people who are used to walking in Scotland will have visited Deeside.  If you haven’t done so yet, I can recommend it.
For more information or to buy a copy, click here.


 

NEW EDITION MAY 2021

 

Walks Edinburgh

Walks Edinburgh, Midlothian & West Lothian

Author: Richard Hallewell

Re walked by: Richard Hallewell

With the partial lifting of the Coronavirus rules I was able to get out to check the routes for my local guide.  I have been walking in the Pentland Hills (the narrow range extending south from the edge of the city) for many years (see bottom left), and it is one of my favourite walking areas in Scotland: a linked network of paths climbing the low (but high enough for a sense of achievement) peaks and criss-crossing the range, plus the quiet access road from Flotterstone, past the reservoirs in the middle of the range, joining with the path which runs through Green Cleugh and on down to Threipmuir.  The paths are usually quieter than I expect – given their proximity to Edinburgh – but locals seemed to be using them to keep fit during lockdown, and I have seldom seen them as busy.
There were no significant changes required.  The paths have been established, and signposted, for a very long time, and if anything they are clearer now than ever.  If you are looking for a sense of isolation, head for the more southerly hill crossings – The Bore Stane and Cauldstane Slap – where you are more likely to have the path to yourself.
Elsewhere, it was a particular pleasure to revisit the path from South Queensferry, under the Forth Rail Bridge, and on along the Forth to the River Almond (passing Dalmeny House along the way), and the walk up the wooded valley of the North Esk from Rosslyn Chapel.  No major changes were needed in the book, and it was a pleasure to see so many people out relieving the pressures of 2020/21 on their local paths.
For more details or to buy a copy click here.

 

NEW EDITION APRIL 2021

WALKS EASTER ROSS & THE BLACK ISLE

Author:Paul Williams

Rewalked by: Richard & Julia Hallewell and Becky Coope

Coronavirus travel restrictions and then winter weather delayed the new edition of Walks Easter Ross & The Black Isle, but we have finally managed to get the job completed!
This is a wonderful area to walk in with a rich variety of walks, from long coastal footpaths on the Black Isle to the lofty peak of Ben Wyvis, there are walks to suit all.
It had been a few years since our last visit and some of the routes had become impossible since then. We had to drop 2 routes around Strathpeffer which had become difficult to follow due to development around the village and the long route to Orrin Dam had to be replaced due to lack of parking at the start. We have brought in 2 new routes, the Right of Way following the route of an old drove road from Strathrory to Scotsburn and a short circular walk to the site of an ancient castle from the old fishing village of Avoch on the Moray Firth with stunning views across the firth.
For many years now the area has been synonymous with the North Sea Oil Industry, the deep waters of the Cromarty Firth being ideal for harbouring oil rigs – and there is rarely a view without a rig in it. However the nature of the industry is now changing and rigs are as likely to be being broken up as built as the country switches away from the carbon economy. In its place, the construction of wind turbines for the offshore industry is now an increasingly common site and the walk to the Novar Wind Farm takes you close to these modern giants of power production. Both on shore and land these great structures divide opinion, but they are an impressive example of modern engineering.
The area is also rich in farmland along the coastal strip and has some magnificent forests, and, apart from the popular NC500 route which cuts through it, is quite quiet compared to some of the hotspot areas in Scotland. If you aren’t familiar with the area, it is well worth a visit.
Highlights include the coastal paths around Tarbat Ness, the picturesque village of Cromarty and the view across the Beauty Firth to Inverness from Old Hill.

For more details or to buy a copy, click here.


 

And now for something a little different…

 

As some of you may have realised, we are a very small company. The business consists of Richard Hallewell – writer, editor and publisher who is responsible for writing and/or editing all of the walking guides – and his sister Rebecca Hallewell/Coope – an artist and designer, who does all of the mapping, illustration and cover artwork. The typesetting and book design are done jointly, and we are proud to say that all of our books are printed in the UK on FSC paper and distributed from our base in Argyll. We started the series of walking guides over 25 years ago, having worked together on various other projects for a number of years prior to that.

When Covid 19 hit in the spring, our sales of the guides (understandably) went into decline and walking was impossible. Although this was tough, it gave us the chance to finish a project which has been underway for a little while, and here it is.

Ka, the Ring & the Raven is Richard’s first novel. He uses his knowledge of Britain’s countryside and natural history – much of it gained during the thousands of miles he has walked researching walking guides – to create a children’s adventure story in which a young jackdaw discovers he has the ability to communicate with other birds and animals – even with people. The book follows his adventures as he is driven from his flock and embarks on a long and dangerous journey of discovery. Aimed at children or young at heart adults, the book is available now from this website.

For more details or to buy a copy click here.


 

COVID UPDATE – OCT 2020

Hello and welcome to our update on various things. Firstly, thank you to all of you who have been buying direct from our website – it is much appreciated. Thank you also for all the nice comments from customers old and new, it is always good to hear how you enjoy the books.
After a quiet Spring, things did pick up as lockdown eased across the country and people were able to get out walking again. We have been kept busy packing orders and also finally managed to get teams out rewalking the books that had new editions planned. I am happy to say that we are up-to-date with that, so new books should be appearing over the next few months. The one difficulty we have had is with the Easter Ross book. We were up there last week and checked most of the routes, but a couple of them need to be replaced, as the walks had become overgrown and could no longer be followed. This means a further visit is necessary and therefore the new edition of Walks Easter Ross & The Black Isle won’t now be available until next Spring. In some ways it is becoming our ‘Bond Movie’ with the release date perpetually delayed!

Thank you again to all of our customers, I hope that you all stay safe and well over the coming months and that we are all still able to enjoy some walking when and where we can.


 

COVID 19

Sitting in bright spring sunshine in Argyll, it is hard to totally take in the effect that the Coronavirus is having on us all.  From a work point of view, we have had to postpone planned re-walks in South Dartmoor, Grasmere, Keswick and Easter Ross.  This will mean that there is a delay in getting new editions of these guides out – however we will be monitoring the situation and re-arrange things as soon as it is practicable.  In the meantime, thank you to all of you who buy our guides – we hope that some walking is still possible over the coming weeks and months or at least planning for the time when things improve.


 

NEW EDITION FEBRUARY 2020

 

Walks North Peak District

Walks North Peak District

Author: Richard Hallewell

Rewalked by: Rob & Becky Coope

An initial attempt to rewalk our North Peak District book in March 2018 had ended up clashing with the ‘mini Beast from the East’.  We had booked a cottage (Loose Hill Lea in Shatton), which turned out to be a very comfortable base for what was a frustrating week’s walking – with only occasional forays into snow filled lanes in white-out conditions possible for the first couple of days.  When we did get out, deep drifts made any route checking impossible, so the book check was sadly abandoned.  We booked the same cottage for a second attempt and were rewarded on this trip with fine weather which enabled us to complete the routes.  Not having walked in the North Peaks before, we were greatly impressed by the area.  Few changes were needed to the write-ups – some previously muddy paths had been improved, some signage changed and some new gates installed in places.  
We arrived on a weekend, and soon found that car parks in popular areas such as Fairholmes and Ladybower Reservoir and those around Castleton quickly filled up, and the walks themselves were also very busy.  By Monday, most visitors had gone and the paths were much quieter.
In general the area is very compact, and less populated than the South Peaks.  It is not far to travel between walks, and you very quickly establish an understanding of the geography of the area, with many of the walks visible from others.
Particular highlights were the dramatic Hayfield to Kinder Scout, Cave Dale & Mam Torr, the circuit of Derwent Reservoir and Stanage Edge.  Many of the routes intertwine, so once you know your way around it would be possible to create any number of linking circuits in the area.  The routes covered in the book give an excellent selection of what is available at all levels.
With the area being so popular, there is a fine array of shops, cafés and pubs for the visitor to sample as well as the renowned caverns around Castleton to visit.  If you are not familiar with North Peak District as a waking destination then we can thoroughly recommend it.
For more details or to buy a copy, click here.

NEW EDITION FEBRUARY 2020

 

Walks North Dartmoor

Walks North Dartmoor

Author: Richard Hallewell

Rewalked by: Richard Hallewell

It was a real pleasure to revisit this beautiful area after seven years.  The name ‘Dartmoor’ conjures up images of bleak windswept moorland, with shaggy ponies sheltering from the mist and rain behind massive granite tors, but while there are a number of moorland walks to tors in this guide – including the short path to the spectacular Haytor Rocks (see left) – there is also a great deal of variety.  There are terrific woodland walks around Dartmoor, including the dramatic Lydford Gorge, the wooded valley below Castle Drogo and the gnarled moorland oaks of Black-a-Tor Copse.  Elsewhere, paths pass through conifer woodland, along the banks of lakes, through farmland and through the picturesque towns and villages of the area.
People have lived around the moor for a long time, and in addition to the thatched cottages, inns and churches, you will also pass the ruined castle at Okehampton, moorland crosses, stone circles and the much-photographed clapper bridge at Postbridge.  And, of course, the ponies, which graze freely on the moor.
The walks had not changed significantly since my last visit – in long-established walking areas like this they tend not to.  Some signposts have been replaced, but otherwise I simply altered some route descriptions which were no longer as clear as they had been.
Dartmoor is a terrific walking area, with much more to recommend it than just the long moorland paths for which it is famous.
For more details or to buy a copy click here.

 

NEW EDITION FEBRUARY 2020

 

Walks Angus & Dundee

Author: John Fyfe

Rewalked by Richard & Maggie Legate

For walkers, the county of Angus is most easily visualised as three stripes, running north-east to south-west.  To the east is the coast, inland from that is Strathmore (farmland and towns), and furthest north and west are the Grampian Mountains, with a series of long, narrow valleys – the Angus Glens (see left) – burrowing in between the hills. Most of the walking is along the coast or around the glens.
The coast is surprisingly varied, with cliffs north of Arbroath, sand beaches at Lunan Bay and the wide tidal basin behind Montrose.  At the far south is the city of Dundee, made newly famous by the siting of the new V&A Museum overlooking the Tay Estuary.  The are fine coast walks in the guide – in particular the lineal cliff walk north from Arbroath to the old fishing village of Auchmithie.
The hill routes tend to be lineal; either linking the glens or crossing The Mounth to reach Royal Deeside (see Walks Deeside for descriptions of these crossings from their northern ends).  The Angus hills are often slightly neglected by walkers, who gravitate instead towards the higher – and more famous – peaks of the Cairngorms, but they shouldn’t be.  The Angus hills have a charm of their own, and the long crossings – Glen Esk to Glen Tanar over Mount Keen, or the paths between Glen Clova and Glen Muick – can provide a wonderful day’s walking.
There were few changes in the book this year.  The major adjustments are in Glen Doll (at the head of Glen Clova), where the waymarked routes are being altered.  The entry in the guide reflects the new (more restricted) range of walks.
For more details or to buy a copy click here.


NEW EDITION AUGUST 2019

 

Walks South Peak District

Walks South Peak District

Author: Richard Hallewell

Rewalked by Richard Hallewell & Becky Coope

Sprained knees and unexpected snowfalls have meant that the rewalking of this guide has been spread over two years.  There have been a number of changes to the routes since the guide was written.  Most dramatically, the old railway tunnels below Monsal Head have been opened to walkers and cyclists, and that is now reflected in the description of the circuit there.  Also, there has been some re-landscaping below the dam at Fernilee Reservoir, and that has changed the description, while work has been done improving the path around Tittesworth Reservoir.  That apart, most of the changes have been attempts to bring the descriptions of the various routes around Bakewell and the splendid Chatsworth House up to date, and to make them easier to follow – not easy, given the number of criss-crossing paths in the wooded hills and farmland in the area.
This is one of Britain’s most popular walking areas.  Apart from Chatsworth, highlights include the dramatic cliff-top walk above Matlock Bath, Thor’s Cave, Dovedale (see left) and the rocky ridge of the Roaches.  These aside, this is a beautiful place to visit; a mass of rounded hills, narrow dales and exposed, rocky edges.  The routes described give a good introduction to the area, but a look at the 1:25,000 OS map will provide walkers with plenty more routes to enjoy.
For more details or to buy a copy click here.

 

NEW EDITION AUGUST 2019

 

Walks Wester Ross: Northern Area

 

Walks Wester Ross Northern Area

Author: Richard Hallewell

Rewalked by Richard & Maggie Legate

Wester Ross is one of the classic walking areas in the UK: a mass of abrupt, craggy hills, narrow inland lochs, long sea lochs and moorland paths.  The roads are few and winding (though the coast road is busier than it once was, due to the popularity of the North Coast 500) and there is only one significant settlement – the picturesque little whitewashed ferry port of Ullapool.  If you are planning to stay during busy periods, be sure to book accommodation in advance.
The area covered by the guide starts in the north with Stac Pollaidh – a typically dramatic north-western peak – then runs south past Loch Broom, Loch Ewe and Loch Gairloch before ending with the popular Red Point to Diabaig coastal walk along the northern shore of Loch Torridon (see left).  Other highlights include the circuit of the beautiful little headland at Mellon Udrigle, the fine hill crossing from Corrie Hallie to the secluded bothy at Shenavall, and the path into the road-less settlement of Scoraig.
There were few major changes to be made to the routes in this edition.  One of the bridges on the Loch Bad na Sgalag walks is still down, so you are advised to avoid that loop and stick to the clear track into Loch na h-Oidhche.  That apart, the major changes were to the system of paths in Flowerdale.  The waymarking has all been changed, but the entry has been updated and the main route – up to the waterfall at the top of the woods – is still easy to follow.
For more details or to buy a copy click here.

 

NEW EDITION AUGUST 2019

Walks North Aberdeenshire

Walks North Aberdeenshire

Author: Luke Williams

Rewalked by Richard Hallewell

This is a beautiful area, starting in the moorland hills to the north of the Cairngorms, passing northwards through the hilly, wooded farmland of Strathdon, and ending at the string of towns and villages – Portsoy, Banff, Pennan – on the rocky coast of the Moray Firth.  In the north-east corner are the flat lands of Buchan, and the great fishing ports of Peterhead and Fraserburgh.  The walking is terrific and varied, though it tends to be overshadowed by the higher hills to the south and west.  Personal highlights include the coast walks passing the fishing villages of Crovie (see left) and Pennan, the dunes south of St Combs, the wooded circuit around the splendid Duff House, and the low ridge walk beside Glen Buchat.  In addition, there are a number of short walks laid out through the grounds of the fine castles and houses in the area which are ideal for families.

It is a while since we looked at this book, so small changes have needed to be made to most of the routes.  In addition, some of the older waymarked routes around Huntly and Strathdon have been removed (as they can no longer be followed on the ground) and replaced by three more recently waymarked routes from Strathdon.  That aside, the major problem at the moment is with the classic coast walk between Portsoy and Cullen, where the section between the village of Sandend and Findlater Castle is currently closed due to erosion and there is some further erosion on the path down to Sunnyside Beach.  There is a diversion in place for the path to the castle; beyond that, please take note of any new signs on the ground.  The route has been left in the book because it is a classic, and it is assumed that it will be re-opened in due course.

In general, if you have an old edition of this title it would be a good idea to get a replacement.  If you have yet to visit the area, I can highly recommend it.
For more details or to buy a copy click here.

 

NEW EDITION JULY 2019

Walks Coniston & The Southern Lakes

Walks Coniston & the Southern Lakes

Author: Richard Hallewell

Rewalked by Richard & Maggie Legate

For walkers, this guide can almost be divided in two.  In the north, the routes described are classic Lake District walks: the climb up the Old Man of Coniston; the hill crossing from Coniston to Dunnerdale; the circuit of the peaks of Wetherlam and Swirl How.  This is Arthur Ransome country (the Swallows & Amazons books were largely based on Ransome’s knowledge of Coniston Water and the surrounding hills), with tight winding roads between stone walls, small fields, and herdwick sheep grazing on the fells.  It is also a post-industrial landscape, with the hills around the old mining village of Coniston riddled with disused copper mines and slate quarries (particularly impressive around Tilberthwaite – see left).  In the south, the hills decline into hilly farmland before joining the sea at the wide muddy expanses of Morecambe Bay and Duddon Sands.  Here the walking is very different, with gentle hill walking around Grange-over-Sands and Cartmel (the home of sticky toffee pudding!) and dunes and salt marshes around Barrow-in-Furness and Walney Island.  Both areas provide excellent – if very different – walking.
The usual small changes have been made to the route descriptions to keep the book up to date.  The only significant alterations are on the route climbing Latterbarrow from Hawkshead (where forestry work on the hill has completely transformed how the route looks on the ground) and on the loop between Dodgson Wood and High Nibthwaite, at the southern end of Coniston Water (where the pathless moorland section has been re-routed and rewritten to make the walk easier to follow).
For more details or to buy a copy click here.

NEW EDITION MAY 2019

Walks East Sutherland

Authors: Peter & Rosemary Koch-Osborne

Re walked by Richard Hallewell & Becky Coope

It has been some time since we looked again at the book for East Sutherland.  This has long been something of a forgotten area, overshadowed by the attractions of West Sutherland and Wester Ross to the west, and of Inverness and Loch Ness to the south, but its big empty spaces – and the fringe of villages and towns along the northern and eastern seaboard – are well worth a visit, and have become more visited recently as a result of the popularity of the North Coast 500 route.
Mention of the area will make most people think of the flow country – a vast expanse of banket bog dotted with innumerable lochans.  That landscape can be enjoyed from the short walks at Forsinard which lead to the impressive new wooden viewing tower, but the area has many more attractions.  The major addition to this edition, for example, are the new signposted walks in Migdale: a splendid area of mature, mixed woodland in a sheltered glen, managed by the Scottish Woodland Trust.  In addition, there are empty beach walks on the north coast (at Bettyhill and Invernaver (bottom left), for example, or along Armadale Bay, by the start of the new route to the deserted township of Poulouriscaig), and fine shore walks down the eastern coast (around Dornoch, linking Brora and Golspie, or by the side of the tidal Loch Fleet).  Inland, there are circuits through the rolling, empty moorland (pick a fine day for these; the charm of the area will be lost in the rain!)
As usual, there were plenty of small alterations to be made.  The guide has now been thoroughly updated, and we hope it will provide a useful introduction to an area which is often unjustly overlooked.
For more details or to buy a copy, click here.

 

REWALK/NEW BOOK MAY 2019

Walks Loch Lomond & The Trossachs

Authors: Luke Williams & Richard Hallewell

Rewalked 2019 by Richard Hallewell and Becky Coope

This is a restructured and expanded version of the old guide Walks The Trossachs, primarily changed because we wanted to include the western shore of Loch Lomond in the book.  The bulk of the walks (and the cover) are the same as for the earlier guide, but the name has been changed and three routes added to the west of the loch.
The most significant addition in the west is The Cobbler: one of the iconic climbs of the south-west Highlands.  The climb is short and steep, but tricky near the top.  The views from the ridge are spectacular.  In addition we have included 2 short walks to the west of the loch, the forest walk at Tarbet Isle and the short stroll to the splendid viewpoint at Falls of Falloch.
Although the routes in the rest of the book are largely unaltered, there is a mass of change in details and some new routes have been added.  The routes around Callander have been restructured, to make better use of the fine network of signposted routes which have been laid out around the town.  We have also added a new route – the circuit by the dramatic Bracklinn Falls.  The walks around Aberfoyle have also been improved and a new circuit by the River Forth from the village included.  Elsewhere, the description of the Ben Ledi route has been extended to become a circuit; a new signposted circuit has been added to the description of the route beside Loch Katrine giving a shorter there-and-back option from the car park at the east end of the loch; and the description of the path between Aberfoyle and Callander has been updated, to take note of the changes to the route on the ground.  In addition, there are a large number of small alterations to bring the text/maps up to date.
This is one of Scotland’s classic walking areas, with fine hill walks (Ben Lomond, Ben Ledi, Ben A’an), wonderful loch side paths and a variety of forest walks.  Since the establishment of the National Park in 2002, the area has become increasingly popular and considerable efforts are made to keep the paths and signposting in good order.  This is a gem of an area with walks to suit all abilities and a great range of services for visitors and well worth a visit.
For more details or to buy a copy click here.

 

NEW EDITION AUGUST 2018

Walks West Sutherland Author: Richard Hallewell
Walks West Sutherland Author: Richard Hallewell

Walks West Sutherland

Author: Richard Hallewell

Rewalked 2018 by Richard and Maggie Legate

West Sutherland is the north-west corner of the British mainland: a wonderful area, with a rugged, indented coastline (including the dramatic Cape Wrath) and abrupt, isolated mountains rising steeply from sea level or from miles of empty moorland punctuated by numberless lochs and lochans.  The population is tiny and the roads are long, winding and often narrow.
The area has definitely increased in popularity since the arrival of the North Coast 500, and Suilven’s (see left) starring role in the recent film ‘Edie’ will undoubtedly add to visitor numbers, but this is still a big, empty landscape where solitude can be found without too much trouble.
The main settlement in the area is Lochinver, and this was our base for the week.  Most of the walks in the book are a reasonable drive from here, but the routes on the far north coast are a long haul and we opted to do them from a base further north.
Little had changed on the walks since the last check, but there have been some minor alterations to signposting, and these are reflected in the new descriptions.  Highlights through our check were the fabulous views from the summit of Ben Hope, the circuit out to Point of Stoer, and the waymarked walks at Little Assynt.
Mention of the Little Assynt walks brings out an important point.  Although the backbone of walking in this area is the famous peaks, there are still walks for everyone, including short routes (such as the path to Smoo Cave, on the north coast) which will give the visitor a taste of the extraordinary landscape.

For more details or to buy a copy click here.


 

NEW EDITION APRIL 2018

Walks Aberdeen & District Author: Richard Hallewell
Walks Aberdeen & District Author: Richard Hallewell
Walks Aberdeen & District Author: Richard Hallewell

Walks Aberdeen & District – Author: Richard Hallewell

Rewalked 2018 by Richard Hallewell and Becky Coope

It was exciting to be heading north-east over the Glenshee road on a stunning day in late May to rewalk Walks Aberdeen & District.  This was the second book that we published in the series – way back in 1997 – and this is the 3rd edition for the guide.
Our base for the week was the bustling town of Banchory on the banks of the splendid River Dee – perfect for accessing all of the walks.
The area has undergone many changes since the book was first published, but many of the walks were found to have only minor changes.  The one exception was the walk around Girdleness, in the harbour area of the city, which we had to remove.  Although the oil industry has slumped somewhat in recent years, the city is still booming with trade from other sea-based activities, and a major new harbour is being constructed south of the city which made this walk impossible at this time.
We replaced this with a walk around the grounds of Craigievar Castle (see left) – one of the great ‘Castles of Mar’ which are a prime attraction of the area.  We list a walk at each of the castles in the area covered by the book (Crathes, Craigievar, Drum and Fraser plus the marvellous formal garden at Pitmedden – all now managed by the National Trust for Scotland).  The castles are all well worth a visit in their own right – Crathes has magnificent painted ceilings and formal gardens as well as the extensive grounds and a great coffee shop, and Craigievar has wonderful ornate plaster ceilings and a quiet woodland setting.  Perfect if the weather is not conducive to walking!
The area covered in the book is very varied, with walks around the city of Aberdeen as well as the surrounding coast and countryside.  Highlights of the city walks are the walk around the University town of Old Aberdeen, the charming old fishing village of Footdee near the harbour and a visit to Duthie Park and its magnificent glass houses (all best done on a Sunday, if you can manage, to avoid traffic).  The coastal walks include the cliffs and beaches for which the area is known – particular favourites are the circuit of the Sands of Forvie Nature Reserve north of Aberdeen, and the walk to the coastal ruin of Dunnottar Castle from the busy harbour town of Stonehaven.
The area is not famed for its hill-walking but the moorland peaks of Bennachie are criss-crossed by a fine network of paths and car parks which provide excellent walking with superb far-reaching views over the surrounding farmlands (see left).
What was very clear from our visit was how quiet the rural roads are compared to the honeypot tourist areas on the west, and what a superb range of facilities are available to visitors and locals.  If this is an area that you haven’t visited before then we can highly recommend it.

For more details or to buy a copy click here.


 

NEW EDITION APRIL 2018

Walks Western Isles Author: Luke Williams

 

Walks Western Isles Author: Luke Williams

Walks Western Isles – Author: Luke Williams

Rewalked 2017 by Richard Hallewell and Becky & Rob Coope

It is always a pleasure to visit the Western Isles – or it is when the weather is fine.  We got lucky, and last September provided a particularly pleasant spell for the rewalk of the guide.
For those who haven’t been there, the Western Isles (or ‘Outer Hebrides’ – you will see either on maps) is a wonderful place for walkers.  It is a big area with a small population and a wide range of landscapes, from the wide heather moors of Lewis and the rocky hill country of Harris to the sand dunes and machair of the west side of North and South Uist.  You won’t see many trees, but the roads are quiet and the sand beaches are vast and empty.  Once you are off the roads and peat tracks the paths can be rough to non-existent, so you will need to be prepared for some navigation on the longer walks, but there is something for every level of ability.  Particular attractions include the standing stones at Callanish, the walk out to the tidal island of Vallay and the old road from Urgha to Reinigeadal, but the main reason for visiting is the magnificent scenery.
The routes had changed a bit since our last visit, so most of the walks have been updated to some degree.  In particular, the long coastal walk, up the west side of Lewis, has been shortened; and the new path into Eilean Glas lighthouse (see bottom left), on Scalpay, has been added, to make a circuit.  In addition, we have added one new route: the popular walk up Glen Meavaig (in Harris) to the eagle observatory.  One other major change since our last visit was the creation of the Hebridean Way: a 156 mile/252km long distance path from Vatersay to Lewis which follows paths and stretches of public road.  We don’t cover it in the book, but a number of the routes we feature use the same paths, so you will come across signposts as you are travelling around.
Anyone serious about their walking should visit the Western Isles at least once.  It is a unique walking environment within the UK.

For more details or to buy a copy click here.


 

NEW EDITION MARCH 2018

Walks Oban & North Argyll Author: Paul Williams

Walks Oban & North Argyll Author: Paul Williams

Walks Oban & North Argyll Author: Paul Williams

Walks Oban & North Argyll – Author: Paul Williams

Rewalked 2017/8 by Richard Hallewell and Becky & Rob Coope

We rewalked our Oban book over the autumn/spring in some mixed weather.  Oban is a busy port, with ferries from here to many of the west coast islands.  There are a number of walking options from the town itself and the surrounding area, covered by Walks Oban & North Argyll, offers a great variety of walks, from the rugged mountain scenery around Bridge of Orchy in the east, to the gentle coastal landscape and islands on the west coast.  We feature walks on four islands – Seil is reached by road bridge from the mainland, but Luing, Kerrera and Lismore all involve a ferry trip – always a great joy on the west! (see Kerrera ferry centre left)
The creation of the cycle path from Oban to Fort William has added greatly to walking options in the area (the last two stretches of the track at Benderloch and Duror are due to be finished in 2019) and we have included some of the sections in the new edition of the guide as possible extensions to walks or to make a circuit.  The section from Creagan to Portnacroish is particularly fine, with sections running along the coast by iconic Castle Stalker.
There weren’t a great many changes to the routes featured but we have replaced one route which was becoming difficult with the short walk to the majestic ruin of Kilchurn Castle on shore of Loch Awe. Waymarked walks are a feature of the area, and the recently improved Forestry Commission walk up Beinn Lora at Benderloch now gives superb coastal views in all directions following tree felling along the route.
The challenging circuit of Being Sgulaird (see bottom left) and the ascent of Ben Cruachan ensure that walks of all levels are featured.  The area is well-served with restaurants, coffee shops and pubs ensuring a fine end to the walking day.

For more details or to buy a copy click here.


 

NEW EDITION AUGUST 2017

Walks Moray & The Speyside Way Author: Peter & Rosemary Koch-Osborne

Walks Moray & The Speyside Way Author: Peter & Rosemary Koch-Osborne

Walks Moray & The Speyside Way Author: Peter & Rosemary Koch-Osborne

Walks Moray & The Speyside Way – Author: Peter & Rosemary Koch-Osborne

Rewalked 2017 by Richard Hallewell & Becky Coope

We had a glorious spell of weather in late May for rewalking this guide.  It was a while since we had visited the area and it was good to become reacquainted with it.  There is great variety in Morayshire – the dramatic coastline with sandy beaches and small fishing villages contrasts with the fertile productive farmland and market towns slightly inland, then the empty moorland and scattered settlements in the south of the area covered.  Running through it all are the distinctive Speyside distilleries and associated grain plants with the seductive aroma of whisky production on the air, and the visible presence of other well-known Scottish companies such as Baxters of Speyside and Walkers of Aberlour.
The area is thriving, and the roads, particularly the main A96 which dissects the county on its way from Aberdeen to Inverness, are busy at most times.  However the walks are mostly quiet and, in keeping with the nature of the area, provide a great variety of experiences.  We were based for the week in an old distillery cottage outside Charlestown of Aberlour, a perfect location to cover the whole area.
The walks are mostly low level with memorable coastal walks from Cullen – home of the famed Cullen Skink soup – a delicious soup made with the local smoked haddock.  The only serious climb is the ascent of Ben Rinnes, which – with its distinctive summit torrs – is visible throughout most of the county.   Other highlights include the circuit of paths linking the villages of Craigellachie, Dufftown and Aberlour – much of which uses sections of the old railway line; the long trek up into the remote hills around the Linn of Avon to the south of the tiny village of Tomintoul (a bike is a good companion here – seebottom left); the ascent of the Bin of Cullen with its fine views over the coast;  the circuit around the historic village of Findhorn on the edge of the Findhorn Bay Nature Reserve and the waymarked walks through the wooded gorge of the River Findhorn at Randolph’s Leap (centre left).
The area is well-served with places to shop, eat and visit should the weather not be good for walking – however the Moray Firth is also well known for it’s dry, gentle climate, so that shouldn’t be a problem!  If you haven’t been before, or for a while – Morayshire is an area well worth visiting for its fine walking and many other attractions, not least the fine Malt whisky!

For more details or to buy a copy click here.


 

NEW BOOK AUGUST 2017

Walks Isle of Man Author: Richard Hallewell & Becky Coope

Walks Isle of Man Author: Richard Hallewell & Becky Coope

Walks Isle of Man Author: Richard Hallewell & Becky Coope

Walks Isle of Man Author: Richard Hallewell & Becky Coope

Walks Isle of Man – Author: Richard Hallewell & Becky Coope

This year, we took our first publishing steps outside the UK – the Isle of Man is a Crown Dependency, which means that, while the Queen is its Head of State, it is outside the UK and has its own parliament and currency.  The island sits in the Irish Sea, is of a regular shape (around 32 miles/51km x 14 miles/22km), and has a population of 85,000.  It is generally known for its tail-less cats, TT racing, three-legged insignia and generous tax laws, but its walking is terrific and deserves to be better known.
If people have not visited the island then the climb up Snaefell may be the only walk they have heard of, but this undemanding climb up a conical moorland hill (2037ft/621m) is only one aspect of an extremely varied walking environment.  The central moorland area drains to the sea through deep wooded glens bisecting prosperous farmland.  The flat northern part of the island is edged by dunes and beaches; in the south-west are high coastal cliffs.  There is a varied coastal path running right around the island (the Raad ny Foillan – 102 miles/164km – see centre left) and a mass of signposted rights of way and ‘greenways’ (essentially bridleways).  More generally, the island has a surprising variety of landscape, so visitors can easily spend a week there and find a distinctive corner of the island – and distinctive walking – every day.  Highlights include the cliff walks of Bradda Head and Spanish Head (watch out for the red-legged choughs on the cliffs), the circuit around Peel, Glen Maye and St Johns (site of the Tynwald Hill, where the island’s parliament meets in the open air once a year), the pleasant farmland behind Maughhold Head and the deep, wooded Dhoon Glen.  The island’s industrial heritage is also well preserved and many of the walks pass sites of interest such as the Laxey Wheel (see left) and the famous railways that provide an alternative form of transport around the island.
The island can be reached by ferry from Heysham, Liverpool, Belfast or Dublin, and there are also links with a number of British airports.  Car ferries operate to Douglas (the populous capital, with its famous promenade), but car hire is an obvious option on the island.  The roads can be busy in places (the island is only a third larger than Arran, but the population is 17 times larger), but you soon get used to the leisurely pace.
I had not visited the island before researching the book, but I am greatly looking forward to returning.  The Isle of Man is a unique corner of the British Isles and its walking deserves to be better known.

 

For more details or to buy a copy click here.


 

NEW EDITION MARCH 2017

Walks Mallaig & Ardnamurchan Author: John & Trina Wombell and Richard Hallewell

Walks Mallaig & Ardnamurchan Author: John & Trina Wombell and Richard Hallewell

Walks Mallaig & Ardnamurchan Author: John & Trina Wombell and Richard Hallewell

Walks Mallaig & Ardnamurchan – Author: John & Trina Wombell and Richard Hallewell

Re walked by Richard & Maggie Legate

A fairly mild Autumn and Winter gave us an opportunity to rewalk our guide to the remote area covered by Walks Mallaig and Ardnamurchan.  The area can only be reached directly by road on the A830 from Fort William to Mallaig, however the ferries from Corran south of Fort William to Ardgour, Fishnish on Mull to Lochaline, Tobermory on Mull to remote Kilchoan and Skye to Mallaig also provide the visitor with attractive alternative means of access.
The area is known for its emptiness, rugged coastlines, sandy beaches and pockets of fine Atlantic oakwoods.  The population is generally small and scattered, with the main settlements at Mallaig, Arisaig, Strontian and Lochaline providing services for visitors.
We feature walks from each of these settlements as well as a number of routes on the more remote Ardnamurchan peninsula.  Highlights include the oakwood reserve at Ariundle in Strontian (see centre left), the wonderful Silver Walk and Castle Tioram near Acharacle, the coastal path from Arivegaig to Ockle, and Camusdarach beach near Arisaig – famed for being the setting for the 1980s film Local Hero.
The guide also features a walk from Inverie village, with its renowned Old Forge Inn, on the Knoydart peninsula – a vast mountainous area only accessible by boat or on foot from the north – as well as a route on each of The Small Isles.  This group of islands, accessible by ferry from Mallaig and Arisaig, each has its own distinct personality.  In order to give the reader a taste of each island – we have included walks which can be done in between ferries on a day trip, such as the climb up the Sgurr of Eigg (see bottom left) For those who wish to stay longer, accommodation is available on each of the islands.
We found few changes on our rewalk, but have included one new route.  Ghardail Walk, a waymarked walk on Kingairloch Estate replaces the walk up Ben Resipole.  Kingairloch, along with many other smaller settlements in the area, now has a seasonal restaurant serving meals and refreshments, and a number of routes laid out for walkers and cyclists on the estate.
In all this is a fascinating area to visit with much to discover.  Careful planning on the internet before travelling can really pay off – or alternatively take the Local Hero approach and just let the serene pace of dictate your plans.

For more details or to buy a copy click here.


 

NEW EDITION JANUARY 2017

Walks The Western Lakes Author: Richard Hallewell
Walks The Western Lakes Author: Richard Hallewell

Walks The Western Lakes – Author: Richard Hallewell

Re walked by Richard & Maggie Legate

The walking in the Lake District is uniformly superb, but each corner of the area has its own character.  Walks The Western Lakes covers what is – for most visitors – the most remote part of the district: the string of dales leading westwards from the heart of the hills to the wide bays and mudflats by the Irish Sea.  It can be a long drive in, but it is worth the effort – not least because this very remoteness makes these the quietest of the dales.  At the head of Dunnerdale you feel a long way from the crowds of Keswick, Ambleside and Windermere.
The main dales are (from north to south) Ennerdale, Wasdale, Eskdale and Dunnerdale.  Ennerdale (centre left) is heavily forested, but is flanked by craggy peaks (Hay Stacks, Pillar).  Wasdale is the most dramatic of them all, with Wast Water (England’s deepest lake, with a stunning scree slope on its eastern shore) at its heart and a fist of great peaks at its head (Scafell Pike, Great Gable).  Eskdale is gentler, with more farmland and a greater population, and with Muncaster Fell, at its western end, sloping gently to the sea at the little village of Ravenglass.  Dunnerdale (bottom left) is, perhaps, the prettiest: a narrow, winding strip of fields between low, empty fells, and with the peaks of the Old Man of Coniston visible to the east.
The usual updates have been made to routes in the guide (new signs, bridges, etc), but otherwise there have been relatively few changes this time round.  The main alterations have been to two walks.  On the Blea Tarn walk (on the hills between Eskdale and Miterdale), the route around Blea Tarn and Siney Tarn has been altered to avoid marshy areas and to make the navigation simpler; and on the walk at the head of Dunnerdale, the path by the River Duddon on the easter side of Dunnerdale Forest has been removed, as tree-felling has made it impassable for the moment (it is an interesting path, so we will look at it again at the next rewalk).

For more details or to buy a copy click here.


 

NEW EDITION AUGUST 2016

Walks Ullswater Author: Richard Hallewell

Walks Ullswater Author: Richard Hallewell

Walks Ullswater – Author: Richard Hallewell

Re walked by Richard Hallewell & Becky Coope

A trip to the Lake District is always a joy, and a sunny spell in March in the hills around Ullswater is a particular pleasure.  The sky was clear, the paths dry and the views as stunning as ever.  Having said that, our visit coincided with the aftermath of some of the worst flooding the area has seen in recent years.  The damage to the village of Glenridding was considerable, and the old road bridge at Pooley Bridge had been washed away completely.  More generally, the water erosion on the hillsides was more extreme than I ever remember seeing.  Everything is now reopened, but it did mean that we were unable to rewalk all the walks in the book during that visit.  Specifically, the signposting of the walks around Glenridding will need to be looked at again, once all the rebuilding has been completed.

Beyond that, there were a few alterations to route descriptions, but otherwise very little has changed.  The Lake District is a busy area, of course (and for that reason it can pay to avoid the summer months, if possible), but there is a reason for that.  No part of Britain (that I know) has this density of superb paths and scenery in so small an area.  Ullswater is a particularly beautiful corner of one of the country’s finest walking areas.

For more details or to buy a copy click here.


 

NEW EDITION AUGUST 2016

Walks Isle of Skye Author: Paul Williams

Walks Isle of Skye Author: Paul Williams

Walks Isle of Skye Author: Paul Williams

Walks Isle of Skye – Author: Paul Williams

Re walked by Richard Hallewell & Becky Coope

It is always a pleasure when the Skye rewalk comes around, and our visit in May was particularly enjoyable – not least because the sun chose to shine every day (which is not invariably the case on Skye!).
The walking was terrific, as usual, but a number of changes were needed for the book.  Most of these were small details (upgraded paths, changes to signposts, stiles changed to gates, and general adjustments to descriptions), but some of them were more fundamental, to reflect more profound alterations on the ground (notably on the route at Ramasaig & Lorgill, which has been changed into a shorter circuit).  A couple of routes have been removed and replaced.  Two of the new routes – the short walk out to the lighthouse on Neist Point (see centre left) and a loop passing Fairy Pools and the foot of the Cuillins – are amongst the most popular walks on Skye.  For some reason we had not included them in previous editions, but this has now been rectified.  In addition, we have added the splendid circuit passing Torran (bottom left) and Fladda at the north end of Raasay.  This is reached via the famous ‘Calum’s Road’ – the tortuous single-track road built by crofter Calum MacLeod, which is worth the trip all on its own.
In general, the walks were in good condition, and Skye remains what it has always been: one of the finest walking areas in Britain (when the sun shines!).

For more details or to buy a copy click here.


 

NEW BOOK JULY 2016

Walks Inveraray & South Argyll Author: Richard Hallewell & Paul Williams

Walks Inveraray & South Argyll Author: Richard Hallewell & Paul Williams

Walks Inveraray & South Argyll Author: Richard Hallewell & Paul Williams

Walks Inveraray & South Argyll – Author: Richard Hallewell & Paul Williams

The latest book in our Scottish series completes the coverage of Argyll.  Walks Inveraray & South Argyll including Kintyre covers the stretch of the west coast from Ardfern in the north to the Mull of Kintyre in the south. This area lacks the high peaks of the north and west, but walkers will still find much of interest and some marvellous and varied routes.  Above all, this is a quiet area, with a small population and relatively few visitors, so you may often find that you have the paths to yourself.
The area is essentially one of low hills and moorland, with a good bit of forestry (and walks through it) and isolated pockets of good farmland around Campbeltown and the north end of Knapdale.  You are never far from the sea, and while there are cliffs at the Mull of Kintyre the coastline is generally gentle, with some fine sand beaches at Machrihanish.  There are two islands included in the guide: the low, green island of Gigha, to the west of Kintyre, and the little tidal hillock of Davaar Island, at the mouth of Campbeltown Loch, which can be reached by a stony causeway.
Apart from the beauty of the natural scenery, there are some man-made and historic attractions which also add to the walks.  Inveraray is one of Scotland’s most picturesque villages, while the beautiful Crinan Canal (see centre left) features on a number of the routes.  Just to the north of that is the low hill of Dunadd (bottom left)  – one time seat of the kings of the Scots of Dalriada – with Kilmartin Glen, with its famous array of pre- and early-historic relics, just beyond.
The nature of the landscape means that the routes covered are relatively short (nothing above 10 miles/16km), but this is a very pleasing corner of the country with some fine walking.

For more details or to buy a copy click here.


 

NEW EDITION JUNE 2016

Walks Orkney Author: Felicity Martin

Walks Orkney Author: Felicity Martin

Walks Orkney Author: Felicity Martin

Walks Orkney Author: Felicity Martin

Walks Orkney – Author: Felicity Martin

Re walked by Richard & Maggie Legate, Rob & Becky Coope and Richard Hallewell

The rewalk of our Orkney guide provided a bit of a logistical challenge.  It took the original author, Felicty Martin, 6 weeks to research the book, which includes 40 walks on the 16 islands which can be reached by road (across the Churchill Barriers) or public transport.
A team of 5 of us set out in early May with a carefully planned itinery, boots and bikes.  Our base was perfect – the large Riff farmhouse in Rendall on the Mainland, which was centrally situated for all walks.  The weather too proved perfect, and after the sleet and wind on the first day we had fantastic clear sunny days for the rest of the week.
Some of us had never visited Orkney before, and so didn’t really know what to expect.  With the exception of north Hoy, much of the walking is generally easy in nature, due to the low-lying character of the islands, and much of it tends to be along coastline, from sandy beaches to rugged cliffs.  But that does not mean that there was a lack of variety or challenge.  Days – especially if visiting the islands – can be long, but extremely rewarding.
The Orkney Ferries were a superb feature, and journeys even to the outer islands seemed to pass quickly.  Bikes can travel free and they were necessary to reach walks on many of the islands we visited.  Many of the islands also had shops, cafes and museums, and where there were no facilities the locals were always very friendly, with offers of cups of tea quite frequent!
It is hard to pick out highlights as there were so many, but the ancient historic sites – Ring of Brodgar, the cairn and broch at Midhowe – are particularly impressive.  Kirkwall (including the splendid St Magnus Cathedral) provides a handsome centre, while the more recent relics – such as the wartime buildings around Scapa Flow and the museum and Royal Naval Cemetery on Hoy – are often poignant.  There are many dramatic coastal features – notably the Old Man of Hoy, which is visited on a walk as well as passed close by on the ferry from Scrabster (see top left) – including geos and arches, such as the Vat of Kirbuster (see centre left) on Stronsay.
The wildlife experience was also outstanding, with amazing views of seabirds in flight close by as you walk along the coast.  Luckily, nesting season hadn’t quite got underway – in later May through to July some species, such as the Great skua (Bonxie), can be intimidating to walkers who get too close to their nest sites.
Two of our groups were lucky enough to be able to fly out to Papa Westray and North Ronaldsay.  The small Islander plane flies from Kirkwall, where there is a busy modern airport.  This was another memorable experience – the tiny, 8-seater plane, reminiscent of a small sports car, flying over blue seas and the fertile green islands below.  Our featured walks include full circuits of both these islands – just possible in between flights!  Having often seen the rare seaweed-eating sheep of North Ronaldsay on television, it was fantastic to see them in real life, from the rugged walk around the coast of the island.  The arrival of a sea haar (mist) almost prolonged our visit to the island, but it cleared just enough to allow our return flight to land.  If you wish to fly to any of the islands, be sure to book in advance – the planes soon fill up, with many local people using them as a means of getting to work.
Creativity also seems to be very strong on Orkney, with many artists and craftspeople chosing to settle on the islands.  Many of the walks pass by galleries and craft shops, such as the wonderful Pier Arts Centre in Stromness, and smaller craft shops on Rousay and Shapinsay.
All in all, a wonderful week’s walking.  If you haven’t been to Orkney before then we can certainly recommend it as a walking destination.  Our advice would be to do plenty of planning in advance if you wish to get out to the smaller islands – oh, and hope for good weather!

High sky above St Magnus Church on Egilsay (left).

For more details or to buy a copy click here.


 

REWALK MAY 2016

Walks Hawes & Wensleydale Author: Richard Hallewell

Walks Hawes & Wensleydale Author: Richard Hallewell

Walks Hawes & Wensleydale – Author: Richard Hallewell

Re walked by Richard & Maggie Legate

The guide to the walks in this beautiful Yorkshire Dale – essentially, walks in the area between Hawes in the west and Leyburn in the east – was completely rewalked in the Spring of this year.  There have been relatively few changes to the routes in this area (except for the felling of the trees in Cotterdale Wood, which necessitated a change of description), so the changes to the guide are largely tweaks to route descriptions to make them more easily followed.  The only serious difficulty in the rewalk was dealing with the aftermath of the dreadful winter flooding in the area.
The Yorkshire Dales are so famous that it is scarcely worth mentioning that this is a superb walking area.  The hills are not high, but the broad valleys, with their patchwork of walled fields dotted with stone barns, provide some wonderful routes.  And, as with the Lakes, walkers will meet with some wonderful inns along the walks.  Highlights include the walk north from Hawes to the fine waterfall of Hardraw Force (see bottom left), the path from Aysgarth Falls to the imposing Bolton Castle, and the gentle walk along the wooded escarpment of Leyburn Shawl.

For more details or to buy a copy click here.


 

NEW BOOK/REWALK APRIL 2016

Walks Pitlochry, Aberfeldy & North Perthshire Author: Felicity Martin

Walks Pitlochry, Aberfeldy & North Perthshire Author: Felicity Martin

Walks Pitlochry, Aberfeldy & North Perthshire Author: Felicity Martin

Walks Pitlochry, Aberfeldy & North Perthshire – Author: Felicity Martin

Re walked by Richard & Maggie Legate

We completely rewalked the old North Perthshire guide last year.  As with the old South Perthshire (now Walks Crieff, Comrie & Kinross) and East Perthshire guide (now Walks Perth, Dunkeld & Blairgowrie) we have changed the title to make the area covered clearer to those less familiar with the Perthshire county boundaries.  If you already have a copy of Walks North Perthshire, the vast majority of the routes will be familiar.  Having said that, there have been a number of changes on the ground and these are reflected in the new edition.
The area has much to offer and most of the routes are well-established and required only minor changes.  The splendid hill climbs are largely unaltered: the climbs up Ben Lawers, Schiehallion, Carn Liath and Ben Vrackie – however quite a few of the moorland walks have been affected by the current spate of hydro scheme building which is present throughout much of the Highlands.  What were once remote crossings such as Corrour to Rannoch Station have been altered by roads to carry construction traffic.  In time these scars will heal but walkers do have to be aware of traffic in previously quiet areas.
The variety of wonderful river and lochside walks is hard to beat in this area, and to complement this we have added a new riverside walk from Aberfeldy to Grandtully – which can be linked with other walks in the book to make a longer excursion.  Aberfeldy, like most of the towns and villages in this area, is well served by an increasing array of coffee shops and restaurants so it is possible to have very pleasant day’s walking, supplemented by good food!
For those seeking solitude, the crossing of Rannoch Moor (see bottom left) still gives a feeling of the vast emptiness of the Highlands and using the train or bus to make a round trip can make for a memorable expedition.
The path network around the busy town of Pitlochry is one of the best anywhere in the UK and can provide visitors with more than enough variety to occupy them on a week’s visit and more.  From the ascent of Ben Vrackie to the circuit of Loch Faskally there is something for all levels of walking.

For more details or to buy a copy click here.


 

NEW BOOK/REWALK FEBRUARY 2016

Walks Crieff, Comrie & Kinross Author: Alistair Lawson

Walks Crieff, Comrie & Kinross Author: Alistair Lawson

Walks Crieff, Comrie & Kinross Author: Alistair Lawson

Walks Crieff, Comrie & Kinross – Author: Alistair Lawson

Re walked by Richard Hallewell

We completely rewalked the old South Perthshire guide last year.  As with the old East Perthshire guide (now Walks Perth, Dunkeld & Blairgowrie) we have changed the title to make the area covered clearer to those less familiar with the Perthshire county boundaries.  If you already have a copy of Walks South Perthshire, the vast majority of the routes will be familiar.  Having said that, there have been a great many changes on the ground and these are reflected in the new edition.
The splendid hill routes are largely unaltered: the climbs up Ben Vorlich and Ben Chonzie, the hill crossings south of Loch Tay and Loch Earn, the paths through the Ochils and up Bishop Hill.  There are some changes in the details, but the routes remain the same.  Some of the shorter routes, however, have been more fundamentally altered.  Specifically, the description of the routes in the path network around Crieff needed updating, while the paths around Loch Leven have changed considerably since the last rewalk.  There is now a fine 13-mile path/cycle route circumnavigating Loch Leven (seecentre left), and this is included in the new edition.  Also included is the circuit and hill climb up Ben Shee.  This is part of the path network around Glen Devon, in the Ochil Hills, which has become more varied and interesting as the broadleaved woodland regeneration has begun to mature.
This is a splendid walking area, with an enormous variety of routes.  The low hill crossing between Comrie and Callander and the den walk around the falls in Glen Lednock (see bottom left) are personal favourites, but there is something for everyone.
There is one final Perthshire rewalk to be completed.  A new edition of the old North Perthshire book will be appearing this Spring.

For more details or to buy a copy click here.


 

REWALK JANUARY 2016

Walks Isle of Mull, Coll & Tiree Author: Paul Williams

Walks Isle of Mull, Coll & Tiree Author: Paul Williams

Walks Isle of Mull, Coll & Tiree Author: Paul Williams

Walks Isle of Mull, Coll & Tiree – Author: Paul Williams

Re walked by Richard & Maggie Legate

This book was actually rewalked last summer, but office moves and other ructions have slowed up its appearance as ‘news’.  Our apologies for the delay, but it does mean that if you buy the book now it will be the new edition.
This is one of Scotland’s classic walking areas, though less frequented than the busier Skye, Wester Ross, the Cairngorms and the Trossachs.  Mull has only one Munro – Ben More (3169ft/966m) – but a mass of smaller hills and some stunning cliff scenery, notably around Carsaig on the south coast of the island.  In the south-west there are also splendid beaches at Erraid and Tràigh Gheal, while near the northern end of the island is the handsome capital of Tobermory (and a fine short walk out to the lighthouse of Rubha nan Gall).  There are no major changes to the walks described in previous editions, apart from a reworking of the paths around Ben More.
Mull is large enough (about 60 miles, around the coast, from Tobermory to Fionnphort via the ferry terminal at Craignure) to merit a long visit, but as the full title of the book – Walks Isle of Mull, Coll & Tiree (see centre left), including Iona and Ulva – will suggest, this book covers not so much a single island as a small archipelago.  The routes on Ulva have been slightly remodelled, to include the short waymarked walks from the ferry pier, passing the wonderful, low basalt cliffs on the way (see bottom left) and excluding the more difficult circuit of the island which involved a tidal section at the west end.  The routes on the beautiful little island of Iona – south and north to the ends of the island, passing the Abbey on the way – have been left as they were.  Likewise, the walks on Coll and Tiree have seen only minor adjustments.  These are low-lying walks, often along white sand beaches (one of which is shown on our header on the Home Page) and rarely out of sight of the sea.
If you enjoy travelling by ferry and walking in relative solitude through stunning scenery, Mull and the surrounding islands are well worth a visit.

For more details or to buy a copy click here.


 

REWALK JULY 2015

Walks Fife Author: Owen Silver

Walks Fife Author: Owen Silver

Walks Fife Author: Owen Silver

Walks Fife Author: Owen Silver

Re walked by Bruce Anderson

In a way, guides like Walks Fife are what the Pocketwalks series is all about.  Anyone with an interest in walking already knows about areas like the Cairngorms, Wester Ross, Skye or the Trossachs, but fringe areas like the Ochils, Moray, Caithness – or Fife – tend to be ignored by the visitor.  In a way, this is understandable, but there is terrific walking in these areas for anyone who cares to explore – and the paths are often much quieter.  Fife has its industrial areas, but there are also some beautiful corners.
The two major attractions are the Lomond Hills and the Fife Coastal Path.  The coastal path now runs 117 miles/190km, from Newburgh on the Tay to Kincardine on the Forth.  The quality of the walking varies, but the best sections – around Aberdour; the path linking the East Neuk villages; around Fife Ness; west from Wormit along the Firth of Tay – are terrific.  As for the Lomond Hills, they are often sighted – beyond Loch Leven when driving the M90 between Edinburgh and Perth – but less often walked.  There is an extensive network of paths over the hills, and though the peaks are not high there is a fine variety of walking, and splendid views from the tops.  Plus, the picturesque little village of Falkland on the northern edge of the hills, with its Renaissance palace and Real Tennis court, is always worth a visit.
Elsewhere, there is plenty of variety, and plenty of history: the historic village of Culross, industrial heritage around Loch Ore, the path from the little village of Ceres to the old tower house at Scotstarvit, plus the routes around the splendid old university town of St Andrews.  Amongst the usual minor adjustments and updates to the guide, a new route has been added with historic interest: Inchcolm Island.  It is a tiny island, so the walk is not long, but there is a particular pleasure in visiting islands, and this one involves a fine boat trip under the Forth Rail Bridge (see bottom left) and the remains of the handsome Inchcolm Abbey (see middle left) – as well as a fine array of bird life.

For more details or to buy a copy click here.